Flesh / Gloss
Fort Delta, Melbourne, 23.11.2017 - 23.12.2017

Essay:
The pleasure of being a bit gross with someone else by Brigid Hansen
 

Trybala’s series of visual flesh negotiations float easily between intimate, explicit and erotic in a kind of coy, glossy painterly play. A closed-clasped finger pushes against an olive cigarette trouser belt, cloud-like marshmallow flesh expanding like thickening mousse over its tailored belt. Cause, effect. Jaundiced flesh, scarlet-rotting tangelo and dishwater green-grey tones converse between each glossed board in a corporeal production line.

 This body of work iterates a working body; playful, pressed, prodded and pulled. These gestures explore the exterior of the vessel-body in a kind of intimate detachment, an intentional ambiguity present as to whether the artist depicts self-pleasure or another’s interaction with the body/ies. There is an idea of romance imbued in the denoting of experience as intimate, versus the explicit act of laying a self bare. In this instance, the self-objectification and framing of personal bodily experience as abject materialises the depicted into both hyper and de-sexualised bodies. Pleasure structures and signifiers are explored as a nostril is nudged, belly fluff expunged, a finger hooked into the wound-orifice. Intimate and explicit are conflated into a subjective erotic where desire is materialised as a combination of objective and subjective perspectives.

 The de-gendered subject present in these works exists in constant relation with other corporeities and yet is not defined explicitly by these relations. Where Judith Butler describes sex as “...part of a regulatory practice that produces the bodies it governs”, Trybala’s purposeful attempt to separate sex and bodily demarcations of such circumvents these relational, binary power structures. Agency of a subject’s body is built through a consented, fluid imagery where flesh morphs and melts into a single entity made up of distinct, though reliant parts. Close-up and faceless framing renders the personal-abject as an act of resistance where the subject is irrecognisable. Imagery is built around an attempt to coagulate rather than differentiate.

 
Butler: Judith Butler. 1993. Bodies that matter.

 Pushing up Glasses, 40x60cm, oil on board, 2017   

Pushing up Glasses, 40x60cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 Late Night WYD, 60x70cm, oil on board, 2017      

Late Night WYD, 60x70cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 

 Anahiras Ear, 60x70cm, oil on board, 2017      

Anahiras Ear, 60x70cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 

 Shadow from a Tongue, 40x50cm, oil on board, 2017      

Shadow from a Tongue, 40x50cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 

 Bellybutton, 60x70cm, oil on board, 2017      

Bellybutton, 60x70cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 

 Squash, 40x60cm, oil on board, 2017

Squash, 40x60cm, oil on board, 2017

 Pink Tooth, 23x30cm, oil on board, 2017      

Pink Tooth, 23x30cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 

 Pinch, 23x30cm, oil on board, 2017      

Pinch, 23x30cm, oil on board, 2017

 

 

        

 

 

 

        

 

 

 

        

 

 

 

    Photography: Connor Sinclair

 

Photography: Connor Sinclair